Tag Archives | social literacy

The next version of ‘Internet safety': A look under the hood

“Under the bonnet,” colleagues across the Atlantic and Down Under would probably say. I put it that way because this post is a bit more e-safety geeky than usual. Parents and caregivers who don’t geek out on this topic might find this mildly interesting, though, because we’re talking about kids’ wellbeing in media and so […]

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The videogame discourse: Default to open-mindedness!

My heart sinks when I see uncritical thinking in commentaries from Internet safety advocates about the media young people love – thinking that defaults (and contributes to a society-level default) to fear that new media’s harmful and young users are either potential victims or up to no good. Take videogames, for example. We know that… […]

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When kids are skilled navigators of our networked world

We all – young people and everybody who works with them – are learning what that looks like: skilled navigation of a networked world. We’re also working out what the skills are, how to teach them and what kind of environment (home, school and media environment) supports that learning. As a society, we’ve only just […]

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Restorative justice eclipsing zero tolerance in US schools

Here’s a model for preventing bullying and a whole lot of other problems: a school that promotes social literacy not zero tolerance. At the Boston area’s Charlestown High School, “where many students come from high-crime neighborhoods, an innovative program employs a surprising method to help keep teens in school and out of trouble with the […]

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All kids deserve the safety & other benefits of social-emotional learning

Think how digital spaces, homes, schools, workplaces and everywhere else we human beings congregate would change were every child to be kindly, respectfully taught the following skills: Self-awareness: The ability to 1) recognize emotions and thoughts and how they affect behavior and 2) assess one’s strengths and limitations Self-management: The ability to regulate emotions, thoughts, […]

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Challenging ‘Internet safety’ as a subject to be taught

“Way back” in 2008 – at least a decade after “online safety” was starting to be seen as a subject that needed to be taught to children – I suggested that it was becoming obsolete. Now what I’m seeing is that it never really was a single stand-alone subject that could become obsolete. We’ll look […]

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Addendum: What about CIPA?

US educators may wonder if schools can adopt the model I’m proposing above and still be compliant with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA). Here’s my answer: If you’re asking “What about CIPA?”, you’re probably a school administrator or district official in the US, and it’s a good question. In order for US schools (and […]

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UK’s teen suicide tragedy: Problems, solutions

The UK has seen too much social cruelty this past week, and now tragedy as well, with the suicide of 14-year-old Hannah Smith. Though there has been plenty of news coverage and analysis already – linking Hannah’s suicide to cruel comments in social site Ask.fm – a formal inquiry into what happened has only just […]

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History & social literacy in 1 children’s book

A wonderful book you’ll be able to add to your children’s or students’ library this coming winter is Gifts from the Enemy, by award-winning children’s author Trudy Ludwig. A nonfiction picture book for readers in grades 3-6, it’s based on the experiences of Alter Wiener, who as a teenager spent nearly three years in five […]

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For families: Connecting mindfully vs ‘digital detox’

It takes a lot more than “digital sabbaths” to become grounded, but it sounds like the creators of Camp Grounded in northern California get that. I think. As described by writer Matt Haber in the New York Times, the three days were as gluten-free as they were tech-free and packed with activities aimed at human […]

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